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How to Maximize your Core Training

March 12, 2018

When it comes to maximizing core training there needs to be a shift in both application and terminology. Instead of opting for a strong core, your focus should be on developing a stable core. Differentiating the two could be the difference between longevity and encountering a serious injury.

 

STRENGTH VS STABILITY

 

To fully understand this new application the differences between strength and stability need to be clear.

 

  • Strength: the ability to produce force

  • Stability: the ability to resist force

 

The average person’s core program consists of movements like crunches, side bends and medicine ball twists. All of these movements are force producing movements and although they may increase the strength of certain core muscles, they don’t allow the core to do what it’s actually designed to do as a whole: resist force.

The primary job of the core is to stabilize the entire spinal column along with the rib-cage and pelvis. It does this by resisting any external forces placed on the body. In order to increase our core’s capacity to resist force and prevent injury we must train using force resisting movements.

 

FORCE RESISTING MOVEMENTS
 
  • Plank

  • Side-Plank

  • Dead-Bug

  • Anti-Rotation Press

  • Bird-Dog

  • L-Sit

  • Knee & Leg Raise Variations

 

During these movements the spine is held in a braced, neutral position while the core muscles are contracted isometrically. This is the safest and most effective method for developing a stable core.

 

CONCLUSION
 

Training your core with force resisting movements will allow you to build the capacity to stay injury free – whether that’s in the gym or while encountering day to day wear and tear.

 

Always remember, a stable core is a strong core.

 

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